The Dumpling Diary

Dis cooking so you cooking too.

Buttermilk Buckwheat Pancakes with Maple-Lime Blueberry Syrup August 22, 2011

Filed under: Breads,Breakfast — Meg @ 10:10 am

1 egg, beaten
1 cup buttermilk
2 tsp vegetable oil
3/4 cup white flour
1/2 cup buckwheat flour
1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt

Mix all dry ingredients well, then add wet, and stir until moistened, mixture will still be lumpish. Ladle a small amount into skillet, frying in butter over medium-high heat until bubbles appear, then flip and cook till browned. Transfer to a plate.

To make the syrup, combine:

1 1/2 cups blueberries
1/4 cup water
6 Tbsp maple syrup (the good stuff)
2 tsp lime zest, 1 Tbsp juice

Let it bubble away for a few minutes, then mix 1 Tbsp of cornstarch with 1 Tbsp water, stirring until no lumps are present. Add to bubbly hot blueberry mess, and stir, letting it thicken. Take off the heat, pour it all over dem pancoo, and enjoy, whilst feeling super-duper Canadian!

The process:

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Cranbaby-Cashew Zucchini Loaf

Filed under: Breads,Breakfast,Desserts — Meg @ 10:04 am

Lubob gave me a thwack of zucchini and peppers, so I made this. Sans shishito peppers.

2 eggs
1 cup sugar (white or brown, who cares)
1/2 cup oil
1 1/2 cups flour
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp cimmanon
1 tsp vanilly
1 1/4 cup grated zucchini
1/4 cup of chopped, toasted cashews
1/3 cup dried cranbabies

Preheat oven to 350. In a mixing bowl, beat eggs, add sugar and oil and mix well. In another, larger bowl, mix all dry ingredients. Stir cranberries and cashews (it’s nice to leave a little handful of those to sprinkle on top though), so they won’t float to the top only when baking. Stir zucchini into wet ingredients, then add all wet ingredients to dry. Mix until just moistened. Pour into a greased loaf pan, bake for around 60 minutes, or until springs back, or tests clean with a toothpick!

 

It’s not oatmeal! It’s Cranberry-Oatmeal Muffins! April 3, 2011

These taste great! …but you won’t like them.
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Look at me, ripping off Oatmeal Crisp commercials. Like a boss.
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Okay, all of that riffa-raffa (?!) aside, here is a recipe for you. I made these this morning, after being lame and falling asleep at midnight at my own get-together last night. So, if you ever find yourself waking up, joyful upon not having a hangover (hello, Swedish pear cider), give these babies a try. Also, if you want to feel wholesome, and can’t find a marathon of Seventh Heaven on television, these should suffice. Note: I realize that many people who often wake up with hangovers generally do not get urges to feel wholesome on weekends… Although our get-together did entail some serious hide-and-seek playing and a fancy dress code.
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Whatever. Muffang time. Wonderful. These aren’t heinously spongy like most goatmeal muffins, and they actually have respectable mushroom-y muffin tops. You could always change up the berries in this, if you want, go with seasonal. Seasonal for me, at this point, means freezer cranbabies. These aren’t too-too sweet, so if you have extra cash for trips to the dentist’s office (I do not!), feel free to increase the sucré.
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Cran-Oat Muffins
(with a crispy-crumble toppin’!)
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Ingredients
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2 cups oatmeal (not 1-minute instant, I repeat! NOT instant!)
1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
1 Tbsp baking powder
small pinch salt
½ tsp nutmeg
¼ cup brown sugar (you can increase to ½ cup if you want these sweeter)
1 cup fresh or frozen cranberries
2 eggs, lightly beaten
¼ cup fancy molasses
1 ½ cups milk (I used sour milk)
½ cup vegetable oil
1 tsp vanilla extract
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For the crispy-crumble toppinz:
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2 Tbsp oatmeal
2 Tbsp brown sugar
1 Tbsp flour
1 Tbsp butter
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Method:
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Pre-heat your oven to a hhh-whoppin’ 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Grease muffang tins, or use liners (pro-tip: spray muffin liners with a bit of aerosol spray/Pam, lightly, to prevent muffin-stick-to-liner discomfort), but grease all around the tops of the tin anyhow. I happened to use delightful little gem tins (which make the bottoms look kind of like mini-bundt cakes), origin unknown. Now, mix all dry ingredients in a medium-large bowl. Mix them well! Stir in the cranbabies now. The flour that sticks to them will keep them afloat in the batter, and they won’t all stick to the bottom. Now, mix up all your wet ingredients, in the order they are listed. Add those to the dry ingredients all at once, and fold it all together lightly, until everything is just moistened, don’t give a damn about lumps! Just moistened, do not over-mix, or your muffins will take immediate and fierce revenge upon you, and your baker’s pride.
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Okay. Now make your topping, if you so choose to use it. Aesthetically, I think it is necessary, and it also helps sweeten them up a touch. Mix the oatmeal, brown sugar and flour in a little container. Then, work the butter in with your fingers, until it’s little crumbs, like what goes on top of Apple Crisp.
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Drop batter into your tins now, and then sprinkle with the topping, a little on each one. I fill the tins right up, because it makes for a good muffin top (yes, a good thing, in this case).  They’ll looka-like this:
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Okay, thwack those into the oven for 15-20 minutes. Mine took 16 minutes, but you’ll know they’re done when they spring back upon gingerly poking with your finger, and/or, when a toothpick comes out clean. Now eat those, and feel wholesome, in a way only listening to Joni Mitchell made you feel before.
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Peace out, river trouts! megohmnomnomnom

 

So good, a clever title isn’t even necessary. March 27, 2011

Readers, I am, in this moment, reveling in a feeling that can only be compared to the first recognition of love. A dizzying feeling that for me, is often brought on by a slowly cooked, lustrous, tomato-y, pasta-y, legume-y foodstuff. Always cooked in a big, heavy pot. Oh, and did I mention, fatty pork products are involved too? The only thing this is missing is wine, and I may as well pour myself a nice, well-deserved glass now.
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If done right, I could easily say that Pasta e Fagioli (Pasta Fuh-zoo, if you’re a Marcella) is my last-meal-ever/death row dish, that or Pasta and Cauliflower (Macaroni and Cauliflower, if you are my immediate family). However, if this was my last meal, I’d die a very happy glutton.  I’ve been doing lots of research this past week on Molise, and learning about the use of chestnuts, legumes, and today’s ingredient, chickpeas (garbanzo beans if you’re a snob). I have never been a huge fan of chickpeas, and I am sworn against hummus, so help me (it tastes fine, but nobody is getting turned on but smushed up chickpeas being presented to them by some pretentious jerk who can open an aluminum can and a jar of tahini. There are only so many ways to make hummus, and your mint garnish does not impress me). But, anyhow, I thought I’d give chickpeas another try.  So, need a change from fagioli? Try chickpeas. The dish has now become the ever-loved, humble and shoulder-to-cry-on (if you need it for that), Pasta e Ceci. There are a million and eight ways to make Pasta e Ceci (or Pasta e Fagioli, for that matter), some are simply pasta and chickpeas tossed together with olive oil, salt and pepper, or in a light broth, other times tossed with pasta, and in this case, cooked as an almost-soup, stew-y, I-don’t-know-what kind of lovedish.
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To go along with this, I decided to carb it up (not that it needed carbs, but I felt like making non-“bread”-bread) with some pizza. That is to say, more of a focaccia bread, but as I have learned in recent days, Molise seems to call all of their flatbread/focaccia concoctions, “pizza.” Which I can get down with. Mostly-cheeseless (and sometimes entirely), not dripping with orange pepperoni grease and actually seemingly healthy? Pizza? Don’t mind if I dooo! This page has been blowing my mind today with all the non-bastardized, non-North-American pizzas, and I decided to make one. Jon and I bought some fairly impressive-looking olive oil this week, after watching Jamie Oliver and Gennaro Contaldo glug/drizzle it on everything, very excitedly, in glorious excess. This was a nice outlet to show ours off, along with some sundried tomatoes and black olives. So, let’s have at it.
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Pasta e Ceci
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Ingredients
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4 oz smoked pancetta or bacon, diced
1 tsp olive oil
1 medium onion, small dice
1 stalk celery, small dice
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 oz (2 Tbsp) pimento, or diced roasted red peppers
1/8 – ¼ tsp cayenne pepper or hot pepper flakes
1/ 4 tsp anchovy paste (optional)
1 796mL can diced tomatoes (3-4 cups)
1 156mL can tomato paste
2 cups chicken broth
1.5 tsp sugar
1 bay leaf
1.5 tsp dried basil (1 tsp oregano, sage or marjoram would work nicely as well)
1.5 cups cooked chickpeas
1.5 cups small-cut pasta, or broken long-cut pasta (shells, ditalini broken spaghetti, etc)
salt and pepper
water
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Method
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In a large, heavy-bottomed pot, add olive oil, and begin to saute the pancetta or bacon over medium-high heat. When sufficiently browned/not chewy fatstuff, remove all but 2 tsp or so of the fat. Add onions and celery, sweat three minutes or so until they soften, add garlic, cook 1 minute or until fragrant. Add pimento (or roasted red peppahs), cook for a minute or so, then stir in hot pepper flakes (or cayenne), and anchovy paste, if you’re using it.
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Add tomatoes, paste, and chicken broth, stirring until tomato paste is smooth. Add sugar, bay leaf and herbs (I used basil because I think it is glorious). Make sure it comes to a simmer if it already isn’t, then turn heat down to medium-low, cover and let simmer for at least 40 minutes or so, stirring fairly frequently. I happened to have dry chickpeas, so I cooked them (not long enough) in the pressure cooker, and finished them up in the pot on the stove, so it took 1.5 hours or so for me.
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Add pasta, and a little extra water if needed (I went with a bit under 1.5 cups of additional water), stir, and simmer, till pasta is tender. You will need to stir pretty frequently, or else surrender yourself to bottom-stick-stew. But do not worry, I believe in you! Anyhow, when the pasta is cooked, check for seasoning, and you’re done. Top with some Parmesan or Romano, and let it’s hearty succulence envelop whatever soul you have left.
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Pizza con Olive e Pomodoro (Molise-style flatbread with olives and tomatoes)
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Ingredients
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For the dough:
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3 cups flour
1.5 tsp instant yeast
¾ tsp salt
1.5 tsp honey
1 ¼ cup lukewarm water
1 Tbsp olive oil
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For the toppings:
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Cornmeal (enough for a sprinkle)
Fresh garlic
Salt
Black olives (good quality, I recommend something delightfully sodium-enriched and stored in oil, NOT water)
Sun dried tomatoes, or fresh tomatoes
Red pepper flakes
Herbs (rosemary, oregano, or basil)
Good Italian cheese (I went with Pecorino Romano, because it was what I had around, opened, but Bocconcini, good Mozzarella, or Scamorza would be equally acceptable)
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Method
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Combine dry ingredients for dough in a bowl, mix lightly, and add remaining ingredients. Mix together until a slightly-sticky and soft dough forms. Knead for 5 minutes or so, until smooth and elastic. If using a mixer with a dough hook, 2-3 minutes until end result. Lightly oil the bowl with olive oil, a teaspoon or so, and rub it around the bowl with the dough (use it as a sort of mop), then flip the dough over, so it is coated on both sides. Cover with a damp tea towel or plastic wrap, and let rise until doubled in a warm place. When dough has doubled, sprinkle a pizza pan (or cookie sheet, whatever you have) with a little cornmeal, and punch the dough down in a bowl. Put it on the pizza pan, and press it out with your hands until it is about 1/2- 3/4 inch thick. Let rise 10 or 15 minutes again.
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Preheat oven to 375 degrees F., and then rub the dough with a little fresh garlic, sliced in half. Drizzle a little olive oil over the dough, then very lightly, sprinkle a small amount of salt. Just scatter it, nothing fancy, nothing excessive. Place some olives over the dough (whole, don’t worry about pits, you’ll get to them when you eat it), you may want to indent them into the dough a bit. Sprinkle sun dried tomatoes or place thinly sliced fresh tomatoes sporadically around dough as well. Sprinkle with a small amount (or a lot?) of red pepper flakes, and a good amount of whatever herb you’re using (I used basil, derrrp). If you wish to, go ahead and use fresh basil, or whatever herb, by all means! Then, place some slices of the cheese around the pizza (or grated, if you want). Add a little glug of olive oil, if you feel like saluting Jamie and Gennaro, and place in the oven, bake 15-20 minutes, until cooked through and top is golden-brown. Cut into slices any which way you want, e mangiare!
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So, that is what you get for today, i miei bambini! megohm, over and out! Alla prossima!

 

Sweet, Sassy Molassy! February 27, 2011

Filed under: Breads — Meg @ 3:49 pm
Tags: , , , , ,

Yes, yes! It is a Molassy Sunday here at 7B, and I am celebrating (for no reason!) with molasses baked beans (via pressure cooker, there is no baking going on whatsoever), and some hearty molasses brown bread. I have a strong feeling it is due to all the fiddle music I’ve been listening to lately, but so be it. Anyhow, the recipe I’m going to hand out to you today is actually one of my mom’s (also published in Two Hundred Years of Home Cooking – Port Ryerse, 1794-1994 cookbook, created by many of my family members, including my mom, aunts, uncles and cousins, recipes from many neighbours and friends as well). The recipe isn’t specifically for any kind of molasses bread, but instead, a PLETHORA of breads, any kind of you want! So aptly named, “Design Your Own Bread.” That’s the kind of recipe I can get behind! As the cookbook states, it is possible to make 525 variations of bread with this recipe, and more, if you step outside the box (bread box?)!  For instance, try adding spices, dried fruit, sundried tomatoes, olives, different liquids (vegetable juices?) whatever! Anyhow, it’s a good guide, just as good as the Neil’s Harbour White Bread recipe that I usually maintain loyalty to, in Edna Staebler’s Food That Really Schmecks.
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So, there are two of the breads I made today (along with some sourdough starter that’s bubbling away in the tropical regions of our apartment), left is a raisin-spice bran bread, and the right is plain ol’ bran bread. All-white sourdough will be my reward after eating all this glycemic-index-approved brown bread.
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Design Your Own Bread
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1 beaten egg
1/2 cup lukewarm water
2 Tbsp dried yeast
1 tsp sugar
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1 cup cereal, choice of: rolled oats, granary flakes, triticale, crushed shredded wheat biscuits,  crushed Weetabix, Grape Nuts, All-Bran, other whole grain cereal.  (I went with wheat bran flakes for mine)
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1/2 cup sweetener, choice of: molasses, strong honey, corn syrup, brown sugar (quite obviously, I went with molassy)
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2 cups liquid, choice of: boiling water, boiling potato water, scalded milk (I went with sour milk that I had in the fridge, and I would like to note that throwing 2 cups of water in, that was just at a rolling boil, is probably not the best idea. Let it cool to 110-120 Fahrenheit, or so.)
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1/3 cup fat, choice of: melted butter, melted lard, melted shortening, melted margarine, vegetable oil (I used vegetable oil, although one day, I WILL try bacon fat. After which, I will promptly collapse, and you can forward flowers – I like peonies and forgetmenots – to Jon, or either of my parents)
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6-7 cups flour, choice of: Entirely all-purpose flour, or 1/3 whole wheat and 2/3 all-purpose flour (I went with all white, but, I think you could probably try using rye or spelt, or some other kinds of flour too, in small amounts)
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Proof yeast in warm water with sugar. Place cereal, sweetener, fat, and salt in large mixing bowl and pour hot liquid over. Cool to lukewarm. Add beaten egg and proofed yeast. Stir in 2 cups flour and beat very well. Add remainder of flour as needed. Knead until elastic. Dough will be a little sticky. Place in large, greased bowl; cover and let rise till double. Punch down, turn out and divide into three portions (note: I split mine in two, because I wanted bigass loaves of bread). Shape into loaves and place in greased pans. Cover with tea towel and let rise till double. Bake at 375 degrees F for 40 minutes or until done. Turn out and cool on racks. Tops may be brushed with soft butter while still warm, if desired.
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(If you have instant dry-active yeast, which is what I often use, go ahead and mix all the dry ingredients together, then add the wet, mix and proceed as recipe states.)
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Here are the results, besides the above picture:
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(Just after first rising, was punched down, shaped into loaf)
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Pre-sliced, just finished.
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All for now. Go bake some damn bread.
megohm, over and out!

 

Nifty and Thrifty! February 20, 2011

You guys aren’t going to believe this! I’M UPDATING MY BLOG! A post! With recipes! Why, yes, it has been exactly a month and a half since I’ve bothered to post anything, and, for that, I am sorry. Once again, like the glorious days of Dexter, I am going to blame this on a television series. I’m not going to go too deep into it, but I’m at the tail end of a Mad Men obsession (formerly The Tudors). So, in light of that, here are some kitschy, cozy, plaid-wallpaper-type recipes for you. Betty Draper style. Sans bitch. Very economical, too. I hope you like…   …ground beef?  Hurr hurr hurr.
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Bobbacoo Meatloaf
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You know what this is. With the addition of MUSTARD SEED SPRINKLES!
I promised kitsch and I will deliver!
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Be thankful you will probably never have to look at as many pictures of meatloaf as I did in this blog-posting journey. Hghghgh. I love meatloaf as much as the next person, but holy mother of…
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Ingredients
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2 lbs ground beef (or a combination thereof of pork/beef, or maybe some veal, if you’re feeling maniacal)
2 Tbsp prepared mustard (cheap old yellow will do)
2 Tbsp Worcestershire
1/4 cup ketchup
3 Tbsp vinegar
2 Tbsp brown sugar
1/8 tsp cayenne pepper
3/4 tsp salt
1 egg
1 small onion, minced finely
1 clove garlic
2 pieces bread, torn into small pieces
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bacon fat (for pan-greasin’)
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Sawwwce Stuff:
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3 Tbsp ketchup
1 Tbsp vinegar
1 tsp brown sugar
1 tsp Worcestershire
1 tsp prepared mustard
1/2 tsp black pepper
pinch salt
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Method
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Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Grease a loaf pan with bacon fat (you know what size I mean, standard Pyrex blah blah blah), or as I did, two smaller 1lb-y loaf pans. In a medium-large mixing bowl, put all ingredients (not the bacon grease/sauce ingredients, gun-jumper, sheesh) in and mix until it’s sticky and combined. Don’t over-mix though, or you’ll have pelletloaf, not meatloaf. Nothing about that sounds appetizing, even less so than “meatloaf.” So, heed my warning! Put into the loaf pan, smooth the top out a bit if you would like. Bake for an hour or until it reaches 165 degrees on a meat thermometer. While it’s in the oven, mix up the sauce ingredients. Just before meatloaf is done (10 minutes or so), spoon/brush sauce over the top (if you have whole mustard seeds and you’re feeling festive, sprinkle a few on top too!), return to oven and let it go in there for the remaining time/temperature. Voila. You have meatloaf. Now touch up your lipstick, take the rollers out of your hair and enjoy it.
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Chili for Arrogant Bastards
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With cornbread!
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Now, I would like to note that at this point, I have nothing to do with any chili cook-off, so please refrain from contacting me about it. I’m no longer a part of any of that, too much stuff on my plate (hah!), planning a wedding and all of that. So, I am sorry for all that business. One day, okay? Here’s a daaaaaaaamnnnn fine recipe anyhow, particularly if you like being a dick and/or chili-snob in front of all of your friends. Or just for self-satisfaction that cannot be quenched by a new Canon Rebel camera with which you will take Myspace-y bathroom shots of yourself with! This has coffee in it. Do not eat late at night. Unless you’re partying hard? Either way, ground beef has never been this badass.
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Ingredients
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1 large onion, small dice
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 Anaheim chili pepper (or another fairly spicy peppa)
2 tomatoes, skinned and chopped into a smallish dice (you don’t have to skin them but tomato skin-curls make me want to curl up and die)
1 lb ground beef
3 cups brewed coffee (don’t make it horribly strong or this will kill your chili)
3 cups beef broth (or water with bouillon, lazybastardstyle)
2 cans tomato paste (156mL each)
1 Tbsp brown sugar
2 Tbsp cocoa powder (YEP)
1 Tbsp Worcestershire
4 heaping (HEAPING!) Tbsp chili powder – seriously, tons of chili powder is important
1 tsp cumin
1/8 – 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper, or more, if you want!
3-4 Tbsp Louisiana hot sauce (or whatever you like best)
1 big ol’ bay leaf (hopefully not too old though)
1/2 tsp freshly cracked black pepper
1.5 tsp coarse sea salt (it’s coarse, keep in mind, so not that much if using table salt. Adjust accordingly!)
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Cooked beans – dry measurements: 1/3 cup Navy, 1/3 cup black eyed peas, 1/2 cup pinto, 3/4 cup kidney. Or whatever blend you want, and if you want, go ahead and use canned, maybe a small can of each, and 2 of the kidney? This is a much higher bean:meat ratio, so, yeah. Beans are up to you. Let’s leave it at that.
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Method
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In a large, heavy pot (cast iron comes to mind), over medium, medium-highish sautée onion and Anaheim chili pepper in a couple of Tbsp of oil or… you know where this is going. BFF. Bacon Fat Forever. When they soften, add tomatoes and cook for a minute or so, then add garlic and cook till it becomes fragrant. Stir in a little bit of the beef broth, enough to easily add tomato paste without sloshing liquid all over the goddamn place. Add remaining broth and coffee once the tomato paste is in there and more or less homogeneously mixed. Add the ground beef (I do not like to brown it in the pan, because I like little pieces of meat, not huge chunks, but you can do what you want), and break it up with a spatula until it’s bitsy little pieces! Add all remaining ingredients, and when it comes to a simmer, turn heat to low (not quite all-the-way low, but less so than medium-low), cover with the lid ajar, and let cook for an hour or so (at least!), make sure to stir though. Or else face the wrath of Chili Lump from the depths of the bottom of the pot. Closely related to Burn-y Del Chilijuarez. You know what I mean. Okay, chili’s done. Eat it. Top it with lots of things if you want. Eat it with cornbread, eat it with toast, do whatever the hell you want. There is a special kind of smugness in every spoonful! Revel in it.
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Also – if you want to know about that cornbread:
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Mix 1 cup cornmeal, 1 cup flour, 1 Tbsp baking powder, 1/4 tsp baking soda, a pinch of salt in a medium sized bowl. In a smaller bowl, mix 1 1/4 cups buttermilk, 1 beaten egg, 2 Tbsp honey, 1/4 cup oil. Add wet to dry, mix until JUST combined and flour mix is moistened, let it sit for five minutes or so. While it’s sitting, preheat the oven to 375 degrees, and put 2 Tbsp bacon fat (okay, you can use butter or lard if you want) in a cast iron skillet (or some kind of baking/cake/casserole dish) and let it heat up till it’s screaming hot. Once everything is melted/up to temperature, put the batter in the skillet/pan, smooth out the top, put a little splash of coffee/table cream on top, and throw it in the oven for 25 minutes, or until the top is golden brown and crackly. Like the picture. CORNBREAD. Magic! Magic, non-dry and crumbly, piping hot cornpone!
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That’s what I’ve got. HOOO-AHHHH.  I’ll try to not be so lazy/busy in the future and get some more posts up at a steady rate. Okay?
megohm over and out.

 

I do what I want! December 13, 2010

Oh, hello. I didn’t see you there!
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Yes, I know I am a sorry excuse for a blogger, but we recently got Netflix, and now I occupy my time with ungodly foreign films. Also, I’ve been on an Italian rampage (after spending, oh 3-4 hours eating a six course meal at Trattoria Giuliana last week), and I’ve already shared most of the recipes I’ve been cooking, so, there’s that, too. Oh, and Jon and I discovered the best wine at that restaurant, Brindisi Rosso. 17 dollars for 1000mL. I do not think I need to explain the pros and cons of that kind of a deal. I have embarrassed myself enough, I think.
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Anyhow, this post is going to be fairly short and sweet, but I’ll leave you with a really great recipe that belongs to my mumma. So, let’s start off with that, and then I’ll spend the rest of the post boasting about my terrific baked goods that I took my blog vacation for!
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Mum’s Applesauce Cake (in LOAF FORM!)
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Oh, how festive our apartment has become!
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Ingredients:
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1/2 cup butter (softened slightly – room temp works well)
1 cup granulated white sugar
1 egg
1 cup unsweetened applesauce
1/4 tsp cloves
1/4 tsp nutmeg
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp baking soda
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup raisins
(a handful of walnut pieces – this was my own addition)
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Method:
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Okay, basic stuff here, kiddos. Get a nice biggish-sized bowl, put the butter and sugar in. Mix until your arm falls off (wait, no, you could use beaters or something – I went old school last night – made it hurt so good). The sugar and butter should be thoroughly combined! This is called creaming the butter and sugar. I would have mentioned this initially, but I know half of the people who read this blog are filthy perverts, very unsavory sorts of people. CARRYING ON, add the egg, mix to combine. Add the applesauce, mix to combine. Then, stir in spices and baking soda, then raisins (and walnuts?), and then flour, until just combined and there is no dry flour hanging around anywhere. Alternately, you could take the classical method and sift the spices and soda into the flour, but I’m too lazy for that, and thus, devised this crafty method instead. So, now that that’s done, put the batter into a greased loaf pan (I think a little bundt cake pan might be nice too, though), I don’t know what size, just… Standard meatloaf size, that’s all I’m giving you. Bake at 350 degrees for 45-60 minutes, or until it springs back when the surface is touched, and a toothpick will come out clean.
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Okay, got that? Now, my favourite part! Let the self-glorification BEGIN!
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This is a fig and almond custard pie. It was delicious.
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This is a grapefruit pie. It was also delicious, and made me feel ever-so-Hannibal-Lector-ish!
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This is some giant wheat bran bread that I made last night!
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This is Big Suze trying to sneak her way into getting some giant bread. The blurry photo leads her to believe she is incognito.
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That’s all I’ve got. Cheerio, readers!
megohm, over and out!