The Dumpling Diary

Dis cooking so you cooking too.

Scones of Yore! November 19, 2010

Oh, scones.
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Every day, I go to work, and after I’m done frying up, dipping, sprinkling, filling and traying up doughnuts, I move on to tea biscuits. The obtuse, tired old cousin of dear, sweet Missus Scone. By the end of the week, I’m so tired of goddamn tea biscuits, I have to force myself to create “innovative,” varieties like sage & onion, or cheddar-dill. Do they sell? I do not know. At least it’s a meager form of personal therapy/preservation of sanity for me.
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Well, here’s a thought. A slight tweak of shape, a sprinkle of sugar, and old-timey British snobbery is just the ticket! My current cultural tangent sent me a message, a voice straight from Jane Austen’s Regency-era England. It said, “Megohm, on this blustery night, I beseech you to reacquaint yourself with the forgotten fullsome delights of buttery quickbreads! Forget the monotony of a day’s work and make scones, at my behest!”  Who am I to question such statements?!
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Good old scones. What’s better with a cup of tea on a cold, windy night? With a  little jam or marmalade, for the sweet tooth? Anyhow, last night, I dug through some of my olde English cookbooks, and settled on a recipe for the quintessential scone, and adjusted as I saw fit. It worked out quite nicely!  I used my scale, since it was such an old recipe, it was in weight (which I prefer, working in a bakery will get you used to that in no time). I’ll post the weight, along with imperial units of measurement as well. These are some big-ass scones, by the way. Here’s the recipe!
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Ingredients
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1 lb all-purpose flour (4 cups)
5 tsp baking powder
pinch of salt
1/2 tsp nutmeg
2 oz white sugar (4.5 Tbsp, use more if you like)
2 oz butter (4 Tbsp)
a handful of raisins, currants or dried cranberries, dates, whatever you like. (Optional)
1.5 – 2 cups of milk (or you can use some cream) – Use what you need. I’ll ‘splain.
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Method
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Preheat your oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit (moderate oven!). In a medium sized mixing bowl, combine flour, baking powder, salt, nutmeg and sugar, mix well to combine. Cut in butter with a pastry cutter, two knives or your hands, until the size of small peas (plus some little crumbly cornmeal-esque bits). If you’re adding dried fruit, add it now. Stir in enough milk, starting with 1.5 cups, adding more as you need to, to make a soft dough, not too sticky, but pliable, not crumbly. Turn out into a ball, onto a baking sheet (don’t grease). Pat down with hands into a circle, 1 inch thick. Using a knife, carefully (you don’t have to be TOO careful, but just so it looks pretty and clean) cut into 8 wedges: Cut in half (moons), Cut those in half, and then cut your quarters in half, so you have 8 roughly even pieces. Don’t separate them though! Cut after baking. Brush the top with cream or milk, and sprinkle with sugar. Put ‘er in the oven and bake for 20-25 minutes, until nicely browned around edges, and the scones have a little “give,” when you poke them. They shouldn’t cave/sink in, they should spring back, in the most pitiful way possible. Not super-springy like a cake, but just so you know they’re cooked inside. Fluffy, and so forth.
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Lo and behold, scones!
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Sopa de Dexter, amongst other things! November 15, 2010

Reasons why I haven’t posted in a coon’s age:
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– I’ve been going in to work at the bakery an hour early every morning (4:45am) this past week, and falling asleep randomly when I get home.
– I’m generally a very lazy person, unless I become enraged and decide to channel my rage into FIERCE housework/cleaning.
Dexter.
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On the bright side, Dexter is going to do a lot for this post, in particular. I have been binging myself on the T.V. series, Dexter, and in the matter of a week’s time, I’m a few episodes away from being up to speed with season 5 (working back from season 1). I am shameless. I am in love with a serial killer. I am in love with Miami, and I am in love with pork sandwiches, and all things Cuban food. I daresay Cubans are more fond of pork than even I. Obviously, they are no less than awesome.
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This post will include a slew of Cuban-inspired/mildly authentic-seeming recipes that I’ve been eating/cooking with brute force. I figure, when it’s cold and crummy outside, I may as well watch/immerse myself in sunny Miami, while eating extremely satisfying food to match. What goes better with black beans and rice than a blood-soaked room and a murder investigation? NOTHING.
Not to mention, if you’re a fan of Dexter, does that show not make you hungry?! Come on, the intro is just food closeups (somehow, Michael C. Hall makes chewing on a piece of ham steak sexy, if that’s not Emmy-worthy, what is…), and they’re CONSTANTLY eating, and talking about pork sandwiches and sopa de whatever.
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Anyhow, to the recipes. As Sgt. Angel Batista would say, I am experiencing too much “passione.” Lawwwwl.
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First things first. An amazing Cuban stew/soup that I cannot stop making/eating. For now, I’m calling it Sopa de Dexter. JUST BECAUSE I FEEL LIKE IT. It’s very savoury and well, I hate this word, but “zesty,” (robust, maybe?) and a little hint of spice, but really not much at all. It’s got tons of healthy vegetables in it, but also some “healthy,” porky goodness. The squash I chose to use in this was a Kabocha squash (typically used in a lot of Japanese cooking, but my mom brought me a couple, and I still have one kicking around), and you could really use any kind of squash, but this one seems quite hearty, and holds it’s shape well, despite extreme tenderness and a more savoury flavour than most other squashes I’ve come across. I love this squash to my core. Normally, I do not love any kind of squash at all. Also, this soup calls for beans. I used kidney this past time around, but I also used white beans before (Navy, haricots, whatever). I would also suggest using black beans or chick peas. Even though chick peas and I do not have the best history together, they do have good intentions.
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Sopa de Dexter
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Ingredients
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2 Chorizo sausages (or smoked sausages), sliced on an angle
4 oz bacon or salt pork, diced
2 small onions, small dice
5 cloves garlic
1 stalk celery, small dice
1/2 green pepper, small dice
3 Tbsp tomato paste
1/2 cup dried beans (or a can of pre-cooked)
1 tsp fresh chopped oregano
1 tsp cumin
1 Tbsp lime juice or red wine vinegar
salt, to taste
pepper
1/4 – 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp paprika
1 bay leaf
1- 1 1/2 cups cubed, peeled squash (1/2 – 1″ cubes)
1 medium potato, cut in 1-2 inch chunks
1 cup shredded cabbage
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Method

In a pot, cook diced bacon. Add onion, celery and pepper, cook until slightly softened. Add garlic, and cook for a minute or so. Add Chorizo and brown lightly. Stir in tomato paste, then add about 8 – 10 cups of water, as much as you like, really, but that’s a good starting point. Give it a good stir to make sure all the tomato paste is dissolved. Add beans, oregano, cumin and lime juice or vinegar, and bring to a simmer. Cover and cook until beans are softened, or just about. Then stir in squash, potatoes and cabbage. Cover loosely with lid ajar, and let simmer until they are tender, but not falling apart when you test the potatoes and squash with a knife. Season with salt and pepper to taste, and serve. I particularly like this with a big hunk of crusty bread fo’ dippinz. This is my ultimate Dexter-watching meal.
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Shrimp Remoulade
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If you haven’t had a good Shrimp Remoulade (reh-moo-lad), you haven’t lived. Any of those $5 shrimp cocktails with ketchup-horseradish sauces can go to hell, because Shrimp Remoulade will always blow it out of the water. Literally. Shrimp cocktails flying through the air across the salty ocean. It happens. At any rate, Shrimp Remoulade is essentially a shrimp cocktail, but the swankest of the swank. The zazziest of the zazzy. If you’re eating Shrimp Remoulade regularly, I suggest investing in a high quality smoking jacket as well. I make it a few different ways, but for the Miami version, an ode to my dear Dexter Morgan (and Deb Morgan, why not?), I made it with lime juice and general awesomeness. What sets a recipe like this apart from most other “cocktail,” styles of shrimp, is that this recipe involves a “boil,” and I don’t just mean a pot of water. I’m talking about a heavily spiced and flavoured pot of water (more of a broth or liquor), which is very typical of Southern shrimp boils. Similar to a crab boil or crawfish boil.  Jon is a big fan of this recipe, “the best shrimp you’ve ever made.” So, you know… I’m just sayin’…
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Ingredients
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For the boil:
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10 cups water
6 bay leaves, ground (throw them in a blender/Magic Bullet/spice grinder, or use a mortar and pestle)
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1 tsp paprika
10 whole peppercorns
½ tsp onion powder
½ tsp hot pepper flakes
4 garlic cloves, smashed
1 Tbsp salt
1 lime (or lemon), halved (optional)
1 ½ lbs raw shrimp in shell (or more! however many you can fit, really), if using frozen, make sure to thaw first…
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Method
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Get yourself a big ol’ pot with a lid. Whatever you’d make a big pot of soup in, that’ll do fine. Add all ingredients from water down to the lime (or lemon), if you’re using that. Othewise, from 10 cups of water down to the 1 Tbsp salt. Give all of that a stir, bring to a simmer, cover and continue to simmer for 15-20 minutes. Now it’s time to cook dem shrimps. You can leave them in the shell (I think it makes for nicer presentation, and well, they’re more fun to peel them as you go, when you eat), but make sure to devein them if they aren’t already. Otherwise, just pull the shell/legs off, and you’ll still have a nice mess of shrimp to eat. So, the pot is still simmering! Just add your shrimp in, all of them! Stir gently and let them simmer for 3-4 minutes, 5 minutes maximum (you won’t need to cook them 5 minutes though), until the shrimp turn bright orangey-pink and curl into a “C,” shape. If you overcook them, bear in mind that they’ll be rubbery as all hell. You can usually tell this by the “O,” shape they curl into. A perfectly cooked shrimp will still give a little “pop!” when you bite into them, but won’t be soft and squishy at all. So, anyhow, get those shrimps out using a slotted spoon, or strain them using a colander. Either way, save the liquid. It makes for a damn fine shrimp stock if you’re into making gumbo or bisque, or any kind of shrimpy soupstew-type thing. Chill the shrimp in the fridge until nice and cold, and serve with Remoulade Sauce (now would be a good time to make that, by the way).
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For the Remoulade Sauce
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Ingredients
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1 cup mayonnaise
1 Tbsp grainy Dijon
1 tsp prepared yellow mustard
3 Tbsp finely diced celery
½ tsp ground cayenne
1 tsp Louisiana hot sauce (more if you like, same goes for cayenne)
1 tsp Worcestershire
1 Tbsp ketchup
1 Tbsp lime juice
Green onion, chopped
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Method
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Okay, this is stupid easy. Put everything into a bowl. Mix it. Check for seasoning (salt and pepper). Top with green onions, transfer to serving bowl. Hey, presto, you did it!
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So, you can serve the shrimp with the Remoulade as an appetizer, or whatever you see fit. I served it with a coleslaw and yellow rice on the side. So here are the recipes for those, if you’re keen to make them.
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For the yellow rice, typically, one living in Cuba or Miami would use Annato seeds, but I do not have the option here, so I went with Saffron. That adds some swank too, I suppose.
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In a pot, sautée in 1 tsp cooking oil:
¼ cup diced red pepper
1 stalk celery, diced
1 small onion, diced
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When softened, add 2 cloves minced garlic. Let cook around one minute until fragrant. Remove vegetables/garlic from pot, and add another 1 tsp oil to the pot. Add 1 cup of rice, and gently toast it over medium high heat, stirring with a wooden spoon, watching constantly (you don’t want it to burn). Rice will smell nutty and toasty and you’ll hear it popping throughout. When it’s slightly browned, add 2 cups chicken stock, the previously sautéed veggies, 1 bay leaf and 1/2 tsp saffron. It should come to a simmer almost immediately (or just let it come back up to a simmer), give it a stir, cover and turn heat to low. Let it cook 15 minutes (no peeking!), then turn off heat and let it sit for 5 minutes, covered. Rice: DONE.
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For the coleslaw dressing, I didn’t go with a typical mayonnaise-based sauce (I already used quite a bit in the Remoulade, etc.), I did a sweet-sour vinegar based dressing. Typically this calls for sugar and vinegar, but I had some homemade rhubarb jam in the fridge, so I used that, and it was quite good!
To make that, combine in a small saucepan:

¼ cup rhubarb jam
¼ cup water
1 Tbsp lime juice
pinch salt and pepper
Optional: 1/4 tsp celery seeds
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Bring to a simmer, let cook, stirring, until everything is homogeneously mixed, and some of the water has evaporated. It should be thick enough so that it doesn’t slide off a wood spoon when you test it, but not thick enough to coat it. Let it cool thoroughly, and pour it over 1/4 or 1/2 head shredded cabbage (along with matchstick carrots and red bell pepper, and I also like to throw in some kind of nut, and quite often dried cranberries). That’s it!
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Okay, final recipe!
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Salchichas Estofado (or, stewed sausages, tastes better than it sounds, ahha)
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This is a very, very tasty dish that Jon and I came up with. But, you will require some stomach room, so be wary of that. The sausages (we used smoked, but you could also use Chorizo) added a really nice smokey flavour to the entire dish. If you can’t find smoked, try to find smoked paprika, since the dish calls for paprika anyhow. This is a really rich and hearty meal, so, you know, plan accordingly. haha. This was served with more yellow rice, and some roasted sweet potato chips.
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Ingredients
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1 tsp fat (porkporkpork!)
1 medium onion, smal dice
2 stalks celery, small dice
1/2 red or green bell pepper, chopped (I like small dice, as with most sofrito/trinity/mirepoix ingredients)
2 cloves garlic, minced
2-3 smoked sausages, sliced diagonally in 3
1 can tomato paste
1 1/2 – 2 cups water
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp lime juice
1 tsp fresh chopped oregano
1/2 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp paprika (or smoked paprika, if you can)
1/2 – 3/4 tsp red pepper flakes
1 bay leaf
salt and pepper, to taste
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Method
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In a large skillet, sautée onion, celery and bell pepper until softened. Add garlic and cook 1 minute until fragrant. Add sausage and let brown, making sure to stir fairly often. Add 1 can of tomato paste, mixed with the 1.5 – 2 cups water (however thick you’d like your sauce, initially), to form a sauce. Add to the skillet, with sugar, lime juice, oregano, cumin, paprika, red pepper flakes, bay leaf, and a little salt and pepper to start. Cover and let cook 10-15 minutes, simmering over medium/medium-low heat. remove lid and let simmer 3-5 minutes, till sauce thickens to your liking. Check for seasoning, and serve over rice!
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So, there you have it. A boatload of recipes (“Slice of Life,” anyone? Anyone?) to keep your belly satisfied while your mind witnesses the horrors and eroticisms of Dexter Morgan and his dark passenger. Or, if you’re just hungry as all hell. You know. I recommend listening to Buena Vista Social Club to enhance the cooking experience. Here’s a taste:
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That’s all for now I suppose, I will make an effort to post very soon, I feel like such a crumbum for not posting in ages. Now, to read Seven Centuries of English Cooking, and contemplate tonight’s dinner (if you haven’t guessed, I’m on an English tangent at the moment, now). So, for now, cheerio!
Megohm over and OWT!

 

Namesake Redemption – DUMPLINGS!!! September 28, 2010

Recently, I realized something very paradoxical. I do not have any recipes on this blog for anything even remotely dumpling-esque. I did promise an apple dumpling recipe, one I made recently, but you know what? It’s not worthy of you guys. It was good, but not worthy. So, today, despite the fact I’ve come up with several different (DELICIOUS) recipes over the past week-ish… I’m presenting you with this: Dumpling Soup.
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This week has been filled with far too much peckish work-snacking at the bakery (I’m not even going to begin about the delectable creation of “God’s finger,” –  and that’s the polite name), as well as a hefty amount of bacon fat-cookery at home. So, what do I do when I want to repent for a week’s worth of artery-clogging? I pretend I’m Japanese. This week’s outcome was glorious, let me tell you. I could eat this stuff forever (not to mention, my shipment of seaweed/mirin/gen mai cha tea came in at the health food store today. 20% discount, chicka-yeaaaaaah).
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Anyhow! Here’s the recipe. Oh, and pretty well all of the ingredients can be found either at a decent-sized grocery store, almost any health food store (or they can order it for you!), or, of course, an Asian grocer.
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Dumpling Diary Dumpling Soup
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Ingredients
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1 strip kombu seaweed
4 cups water
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16 gyoza skins or, if you can’t find them, wonton skins will do, just be crafty with your folding.
150 grams ground pork ( I bet you could get away with other ground meats as well, but, as I’ve said before, Pork is King)
1 Tbsp minced garlic (fresh)
1 tsp minced ginger (fresh, of course)
1 tsp sesame oil
2 Tbsp soy sauce
1 green onion (negi!) sliced very thin
1/2 tsp chili paste (or chili flakes will work too, or even hot sauce)
1/2 tsp salt
2 tsp cornstarch
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4Tbsp soy sauce (more or less, if you like – the seaweed can be pretty salty, but adjust as you see fit)
1/2 tsp sesame oil
2 Tbsp mirin (Japanese cooking wine)
1 piece wakame seaweed, crumbled or sliced (you could use another kind, maybe nori, or even kombu if sliced PAPER-THIN)
1/2 tsp sliced ginger root
1 clove sliced garlic
8 water chestnuts, halved (canned, by the way)
1 carrot, peeled and thinly sliced
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I realize this looks like a long list of ingredients, but most of them just repeat themselves throughout the recipe, so keep them handy when you’re cooking. This isn’t as long and invasive as it seems, honest!
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Method
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For the dashi:
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First of all, we make the dashi stock, using the strip of kombu and 4 cups of water.
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What you want to do is either let the kombu soak for 15 or 20 minutes in the water, then bring to a boil for a minute or so, and remove the kombu, OR, bring both to a boil and let simmer on medium-low or so for 4 minutes, then remove kombu. Easy stuff. Turn off the heat.
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For the dumplings:
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In a small bowl, combine all ingredients from ground pork to salt, all of them! Mix until you have a sticky little ball of meat. Wonderful. Now, get your gyoza or wonton skins, and using your finger and a bit of water, wet around the edges of half the wrapper. Then, place about a teaspoon of the pork filling inside. Fold the wrapper in half, sealing with little pleats, or, just in half! I honestly don’t give a damn what you do. I’m tedious and somewhat of a perfectionist, so, I pleated. Here’s a nice little dumpling-folding tutorial from Youtube. What a nice lady. Here’s how I did mine (I used square wrappers, so mine are a bit crazy looking, but I like them):
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Whatever you do, make sure you seal the living hell out of them. Crease like you’ve never creased before! These little darlings are going into soup. We don’t want a dumpling massacre.
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Anyhow, set those aside for a bit (I chose to freeze half for another time).
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Now, let’s get back on that stock/soup-base.
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This is easy too. Get the dashi back on the burner, at around medium heat, and add all ingredients from the 4 Tbsp soy sauce to the water chestnuts. You can taste for seasoning at this point, if you’d like. You might want more soy sauce, if you think it’s too subtle. I have a smoker’s tongue, I tend to like a lot of salt, sorry concerned family and friends. When you’re satisfied with the broth, add the dumplings! Let simmer for about five minutes, then add your carrots, and continue to simmer for another five minutes or so, until the pork is cooked through. You can check by simply hoisting out a dumpling, and cutting into it. If it’s cooked, eat it. Then, pick yourself up off the floor, maintain sturdiness about the knees, and try to dole some out into a bowl. You can garnish with sliced green onions if you like (I’m thinking of adding a poached egg or two next time). This is a deceptively delicious soup.
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Okay, that’s what I’ve got for you at this time, perhaps tomorrow (or sometime very soon) I’ll post my recipes from last night’s dinner: Smothered Pork Chops, Sage-Dijon Roasted Squash and Jalapeno-Cheddar-Bacon (I’m so ashamed!!!) Spoonbread. It was goddamn delicious. And, for now, I have to go drink some coffee, read some food blogs, and then get my procrastinating ass to work on that grape jelly I’ve been meaning to get together. I bought snap lids tonight and a canning funnel, so if I don’t have it done, you have my permission to beat me down.
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Bisous,
megohm.

 

Heaven sends us meat, but the devil sends us cooks. September 22, 2010

Filed under: Appetizers,Main Dishes — Meg @ 12:08 am
Tags: , , , , , ,

It’s time to salute my knight in shining armor (read: adorned with Japanese Global Knives), Tony. Mr. Bourdain. “If you’re slower than me, stupider than me and you taste good…tough shit.”
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Sigh.
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This pretty much sums it up – sorry, squeamish fellas.
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Last night, Jon and I were up way too late watching Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations. Specifically, the Food Porn series .  How risqué. Well, if you’re as vulnerable and devoted to food (in all it’s forms) as this humble minion, well… Good. Lord. There were moments where I sat in bed watching the program, paralyzed, hand plastered to my face, jaw agape, weakened, inspired, transformed and hungry. After a week of eating delicate, healthful Japanese cuisine (mostly) and more than my normal amount of poultry consumption, I realized what I needed was a good steak. Something to satisfy my inner Bourdainiac. As far as I’m concerned, there are few things in life as satisfying as that.
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So, tonight, I wanted to make steak, nay, I needed to make it! With many a T-bone on hand, that’s just what I did. Normally, I prefer sirloin, strip, rib-eyes, but T-bones were in inventory, so that’s what happened. I just wanted something simple, and just… Meaty, in essence. No cream sauce, none of that. Just the richest, juiciest steak possible with what I had on hand. Since Jon was working, my friend Ally joined me for dinner, and cooking. While steak non-negotiable, we put together a meal of T-bones, little red baked potatoes, simple croutones (crostini) rubbed with garlic and butter, and a lovely varied crudité plate with homemade lemon-garlic dip. I can not imagine anything so perfect for dinner! Anyhow, I’m going to give you the recipe for the steak, as well as the lemon-garlic dip, now arrogantly regarded as trempette à l’ail et au citron. Heh. We had to battle my kitten, Big Suze, to get at it. She was ravenous in her efforts. Not a cauliflower fan though, the vegetables were left untouched. Okay. Leh’s do this. By the way, incredibly easy recipes.
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Steak au moutarde
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Ingredients
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2 T-bone steaks (I suppose you could use another, 1 1/4 ” thickness or so)
salt and pepper
2 Tbsp grainy Dijon mustard (I used Maille)
2 garlic cloves
1 tsp paprika
2 sprigs fresh thyme leaves (you could use 1/2 tsp dried thyme, also, I think)
3 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce
3 Tbsp melted butter
2-3 tsp softened butter
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Method
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Place the steaks on a broiling rack or in a cast iron pan, or some sort of baking dish (pyrex casserole might do), salt and pepper liberally on both sides.
In a mortar and pestle, mash garlic, then combine with mustard, paprika, thyme and mash to a bit of a paste. Add Worcestershire and blend in. Then, slowly add melted butter and continue to stir it around until it’s all homogeneous and thickened somewhat (no biggie). * If you’re not using a mortar and pestle, you could just combine all of these in a bowl, making sure the garlic is minced ahead of time.
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Slather this mixture over both sides of steak, optionally letting rest for 15-30 minutes. Then, put in pre-heated oven set to broil, 5 minutes for the first side, 4.5 minutes for the second side, about 3 inches from the broiler element. This will achieve a nice medium-rare steak.  Rub remaining softened butter on the steak (I’m not even kidding. Take it from me, that’s why restaurant steaks/everything else taste so damn good. Butter).  Let it rest for 5-10 minutes afterwards, so the juices re-distribute throughout the meat. Also, Food Handler’s courses will tell you otherwise, but it’s best to let your steak come up to room temp first, so let it sit outside of the fridge for 45 minutes or so before you even start with the whole procedure… Just makes for a better steak. Better broil/grill and so forth.
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For the trempette (heh, heh, heh. Dip):
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Ingredients
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3/4 cup sour cream
1/3 cup mayonnaise (homemade is best, but you know that, my little gourmands)
1 Tbsp fresh lemon zest
3 Tbsp fresh lemon juice (add more if you wish to have more tangy zangy)
2 grated or minced garlic cloves
1 tsp salt (I used kosher)
1/4 tsp black pepper
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Method
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Mix it all up! That’s it!
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For such a simple dip, it was incredibly good – we even ended up putting some on our potatoes! The garlic and black pepper added some peppiness, a little bit of heat, which was really nice. I might also suggest adding some fresh dill to this, if I had some, I definitely would have.
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Anyhow, that’s all for now. I WILL get to that apple dumpling recipe soon, but that rogue steak told me to do otherwise for today’s post… Right now, I’ve got sleep to catch up on, Food Porn did me in last night (I’M SUCH A CARD, HO HO).
Megohm over and out!

 

It bin too long. January 5, 2010

Filed under: Appetizers,Main Dishes — Meg @ 6:01 am

And I’m so full of New Year cheer, here’s a recipe. WHAAAAAAAAAAAAT?!

The happs – they have been crazy. No need to explain, just eat some shrimp. These are pleasantly heated. Yes!

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Jon’s Spicy Citrus Shrimp

  • 2-3 jalapeno peppers, roughly chopped (remove seeds if desired)
  • 5 garlic cloves, sliced
  • 3 tangerines, juiced, zest of 1
  • 1 lemon, juiced and zested
  • 1lime, juiced and zested
  • 1/2 onion, sliced
  • 1/2 grated ginger
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4-5  sprigs fresh thyme, coarsely chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili flakes
  • 1 lb raw black tiger shrimp peeled and de-veined
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin

Directions

Combine all ingredients except shrimp in a heavy plastic freezer bag, or in a large, shallow bowl.
Immerse shrimp in marinade, and refrigerate 30 minutes.
Skewer shrimp and place on a baking sheet, pouring a little bit of marinade over each skewer.
Broil 2-3 minutes each side.

IF you want (and I recommend), reserve and strain some of the marinade (prior to adding shrimp) into a small saucepan and bring to a boil, and let it reduce by about 1/4 in volume. You will be left with a sauce. You can put it on rice. It’s good. I promise.

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My new year’s resolution includes making you fat. Okay! More posts!

(I realize this post is sub-par, but it comes out of neglect and desperation, like an English essay where you find out there is no extension coming your way. There is only one phrase to describe such a situation: “Balls.” And it is applicable here.)

Jon would also like to inform you all that he is watching “Dirty Jobs,” on Discovery, and he loves Mike Rowe.